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TravelinTeachers Family Tree: Dunn Family


History of the family of William & Mary Dunn


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Welcome! These pages represent much of the information we have on our Dunn family line. Clicking the descendant's chart link to the left should provide you with a list of names, and links to get you to their information. Or, follow the family lines by clicking on the kids' names listed on each page.

If you have any information about these lines, we would love to hear from you! Please also see our home page (link at left) for further information and other family lines.

Happy Hunting! Jan, Jim, and Julie

This page is a work in progress. January 2012.



William Dunn


Our earliest-known Dunn ancestor is William Dunn. We do not know when, or where William was born.

According to Dr. William Edward Dunn, in his book entitled The James McMurry Dunn Family of Texas and Kentucky, family tradition holds that the family came from County Derry, Northern Ireland. We do not know if William was the immigrant.


Our first record of William is from the parish records of St. James Parish, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, which note the birth on October 12, 1754, of Hannah Dunn, daughter of William Dunn and Mary his wife. Our next record of William is from December 25, 1769, when William signed as one of four witnesses to the will of Richard Shekell in Ann Arundel County, Maryland.

William later moved to Montgomery County, Maryland, where he resided during the 1770s and 1780s. In about late 1795 or early 1796, William and his family moved to Garrard County, Kentucky, where William remained for the rest of his life. William died circa 1808.

William and his wife Mary were the parents of at least seven, possibly eight children..




WILLIAM'S MARRIAGE

As shown by the birth record for daughter Hannah, the consent for daughter Nelly's wedding, and by probate records, William was married to a MARY UNKNOWN.


We do not know when or where William and Mary married. And at this time, we do not know Mary's maiden name, nor do we know anything of her family.




ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND





It appears that from at least October 1754 until December 1769, or perhaps as late as 1772, William and Mary lived in the St. James Parish of Anne Arundel County.


HISTORY OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY

The following history of Anne Arundel County is from the Anne Arunel GebWeb Page:

Anne Arundel County was first settled during the winter of 1649/1650 at Providence, across the Severn River from Annapolis, by Puritans & Independents from Virginia who resisted Gov. Berkleys demands for them to attend services at the Church of England. Anne Arundel County was formed in the summer of 1650, the third county formed in Maryland and was named in honor of Lady Anne Arundel, wife of Cecilus (Calvert), Lord Baltimore. There were two types of subdivisions found in the County and its records in its early history. The first were hundreds. The concept of a hundred is old and dates to the Roman occupation of England. A Hundred was said to be an area that could raise a force of 100 soldiers However, Hundreds in Maryland seemed to primarily been used for tax collection and land rent purposes. The second subdivision occurred in 1692 when Parishes for the Church of England were established in Maryland.

There were Five hundreds in Anne Arundel Co in 1707:
Herring Creek Hundred was the southern-most part of the County
West River Hundred lay to the the north Herring Creek Hundred, around the West River,
South River Hundred, was the area between West River Hundred and the South River
Middle Neck Hundred took in the area between the South River and Severn River
Broad Neck and Town Hundred. was area east of the Severn River and included the original settlement of Providence

In 1692 the Maryland Assembly passed an act establishing the Church of England as basically the state church and setup the establishment of Parish boundaries and establish vestries to support the church. The parish register, as required by the Act of Establishment of the Church of England, recorded (albeit sporadically and incompletely) the births, baptisms, marriages, and burials in the parish. The Parishes for Anne Arundel County through the 18th Century were:

St James Parish (also called Herring Creek Parish) took in all of Herring Creek Hundred and part of the West River Hundred. It basically took in the southern part of Anne Arundel County below West River and Muddy Creek.

All Hallows Parish (also called South River Parish) took in the area of South River Hundred and part of West River Hundred. It is basically the area south and west of South River, bounded to the south by St James Parish. All Hallows Church is located today near Davidsonville. The original church was apparently erected near Birdsville.

St Annes Parish. (also known as Middle Neck Parish) included the land between the South River and Severn River. The church is located today in the center of Church Circle in Annapolis.

St Margaret's, Westminister Parish (also called Broad Neck Parish) This parish took in Broad Neck and Town Hundreds and was the area east and north of Severn River extending up to the Baltimore County Line (St Paul's Parish).

Christ Church, Queen Caroline Parish, was formed in 1728 from the western portions of All Hallows, St Anne's and St Margaret's, Westminster Parishs. This parish included the area which is now Howard County and the western edge of Anne Arundel County. The chapel was built near Guilford.


ST. JAMES PARISH

The following history of St. James Parish is posted on the parish's web page.

In 1692, St. James' Parish, Old Herring Creeke, was officially established when the Maryland Assembly, acting on the orders of Sir Lionel Copely, Royal Governor of Maryland, enacted the Act of Establishment. That Act divided the Province of Maryland into 30 Anglican Parishes. There were, however, people worshiping in the area before that time. The exact location of that church is unknown. In 1695, the vestry ordered a church built on the present site.

The Rev. Henry Hall was called as the first rector, and remained at St. James' until his death in 1722. When the old church became inadequate for the needs of the parish in 1763, the vestry ordered that a new church be built. It was completed in 1765, and continues to serve the congregation today.

Building was begun on St. James' Church in 1763 and was finished in 1765. It replaced a church which was built of wood in 1695. Prior to 1695 there was a church but at this time no one knows where or when it was built. The present church has undergone some changes since it was built in 1763. Originally all of the windows were clear. The south door was used as the front door when it was first built and the pulpit would have been located on the north wall directly opposite the front entrance. Oak Tablets, containing the 10 Commandments, the Lord's Prayer, and the Apostles' Creed were taken from the 1695 church and placed on the walls of the present church.



St. James Parish, 1936


St. James Parish, 2010


St. James Belfry


St. James Historical Marker


St. James Sign


The church is located off of Route 2, at 5757 Solomons Island Road, Maryland, about 16 miles south of Annapolis.




LAND IN ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY

According to Dr. Dunn, there is no record of William having owned land in Anne Arundel County. William's name does not appear on a 1767 plat of Anne Arundel Manor - however we note that many of the properties are simply listed by their name.




Plat of Anne Arundel Manor in 1767
(Maryland State Archives Accession No.: 40,283-162 MSA No.: S65-61 Location: B5/10/1/)
Four Shekell properties are shown in color
Click on image for full-size view
Map found at Genealogy of the Shekell Family in America




BIRTH OF DAUGHTER HANNAH

As noted above, our first record of William and Mary is from the parish records of St. James Parish, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, which note the birth on October 12, 1754, of Hannah Dunn, daughter of William Dunn and Mary his wife.




BIRTH OF SON AUGUSTINE

According to DAR papers, William and Mary's son Augustine was born in Anne Arundel County on December 7, 1757.




WILL OF RICHARD SHEKELLS

Our next record of William is from December 25, 1769, in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, when he served as one of four witnesses to will of Richard Shekells. The other three witnesses were Jacob Franklin, Benjamin Carr, and John Shekell.


Richard's will was filed for probate on March 17, 1770. William was one of three subscribing witnesses who appeared in court to prove up the will.


William and Mary's daughter, Hannah, married Richard's son Hezekiah Shekells, in 1772, in St. James Parish, Anne Arundel County, Maryland.


According to family tradition, the Dunn family carried a copy of Richard's will with them when they migrated to Kentucky.


Will of Richard Sheckell


Will of Richard Shekell, 1770, Ann Arundel, Liber 37, folio 484, in the Maryland State Archives.
Transcribed by Richard's descendant, Richard Shekelle.
"In the Name of God Amen. I Richard Sheakles of Annarundel County and Province of Maryland being weak of body but of a sound and perfect mind and Memory Do make Constitute and Ordain this to be my last will and testament in manner and form following. viz
Imprimis I will and order my executrix hereafter named to pay all my just and lawful _?_ Demands against me. Item I give and bequeath unto my dear and loving wife, Ruth Sheakels all the lands which is mine and which I now have in my possession with one third part of my personal estate during her life but after her decease my will is that my said lands should be sold and the money their from arising should be equally devided between my several children and their heirs forever.
Item but my will is, as several of my children are settled viz John Richard Ann and Mary and I have before this given to them Negroes and several other things my will is that they shall not come in for any part of my estate until the rest of the children have received as much in value as what they have had and what then shall remain of my estate after my debts are paid I will and order to be equally divided between my several children and their heirs forever.
And lastly I do nominate and appoint my dear and loving wife Ruth Sheakles whole and sole executrix of this my last will and testament hereby revoking all others heretofore and affix my seal this twenty fifth day of December One Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty Nine."
/signed/ Richard Shekell.
Witnessed by Jacob Franklin, Benj. Carr, William Dunn, John Shekell.

The following was written on the back of the will.
"Ann Arundel County to wit March 17th 1770 -- came Benjamin Carr William Dunn and John Shekell 3 of the Subscribing Evidences to the written will and made oath that they saw the Testator herein named sign and seal and heard him publish pronounce and Declare the same to be his Last Will and Testament and that at the Time of his so doing he was in the best of their apprehensions of a sound and disposing mind Memory and understanding and that they Severally Subscribed their names to said will as Evidences thereto in the presence and at the request of the Testator and in the presence of each other. Sworn before Elie Vallette Deputy Commissary Ann Arundel County"


* note: Richard did not mention his son Hezekiah in his will. But, the estate balance for Richard, dated November 13, 1771, named Hezekiah as a child.




MARRIAGE OF DAUGHTER HANNAH

As noted above, William and Mary's daughter Hannah married Hezekiah Shekells, in 1772, in St. James Parish, Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Hannah and Hezekiah were married by Walter Magowan, Rector of St. James' Parish.


We presume William and Mary were still living in St. James Parish at this time.




MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND



At some point, we presume in the 1770s, the Dunns moved to Montgomery County, Maryland.

The next record we have for the family is from 1777, when a William Dunn appears on the 1777 Tax List for Montgomery County, Maryland, Lower Part of Newfoundland Hundred. William is listed with two taxables.

We do not know if this record refers to William, or to his son William. Nevertheless, it is clear that William Sr. did move to Montgomery County, as did a number of his children. William Dunn Sr., William Dunn Jr., and Augustine Dunn appear on a 1778 "List of Taxables" for Lower Newfoundland Hundred, Montgomery County, Maryland.




HISTORY OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND

Montgomery County was created in 1776 from Frederick County, which had been created from parts of Baltimore and Prince George's Counties in 1748. Prince George's had been created from Calvert and Charles counties in 1695.

Montgomery County is situated just to the north of Washington D.C. and to the southwest of Baltimore.




REVOLUTIONARY WAR

On February 28, 1778, William Dunn, William Dunn Jr., and Auguston Dunn took the oath of fidelity to the American Revolutionary Government before the Honorable Edward Burgess in Montgomery County, Maryland. A Hugh Smith Dunn also took the oath before the Hon. Edward Burgess on this day. We do not know the relationship, if any, of this Hugh Dunn.

Thomas Aldridge and Nicholas Hocker also took the oath before the Hon. Edward Burgess on this day. Their daughters married Augustine and Benjamin Dunn, sons of William and Mary Dunn.





The publication entitled Maryland and Delaware Revolutionary Patriots, 1775-1783 Military Records Montgomery County lists the following Revolutionary War patriots:

William Dunn: Private, 7th Co., Lower Bn., Militia, Aug., 1777. Took the Oath of Allegiance before the Hon. Edward Burgess on Feb. 28, 1778. Rendered aid by providing wheat for use of the military in 1780. Lived in the Lower Part of Newfoundland Hd. (two taxables) in 1777.

William Dunn, Jr.: Took the Oath of Allegiance before the Hon. Edward Burgess on Feb. 28, 1778.





William Dunn Sr. is a listed patriot with the Daughters of the American Revolution, as is his son Augustine.




MORE FROM MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND

PURCHASE OF "HARD STRUGGLE" & "GOOD WILL"


On November 11, 1780, William Dunn purchased two adjoining tracts of land in Montgomery County from Abraham Davenport of Berkeley County, Virginia.

The larger tract contained 243 acres, and was known as "Hard Struggle, formerly Friendship Enlarged." Consideration 315 pounds sterling.

The second tract consisted of 20 1/4 acres, known as "Good Will." Consideration of 18 shillings.

Recorded in Liber A, pp. 584-585, Montgomery County Deed Records, County Court House, Rockville, Maryland.
On the margin of each deed there appears the notation: Examd and Deld - William Dunn, Jr.


As later records (tax and sale) show, this is William Dunn Sr.




Friendship Enlarged

Williams land was part of the old grant known as Friendship Enlarged. This grant was originally made to Alexander Beall in August of 1713. The original grant was for 600 acres, which was called "Friendship." Alexander complained that a considerable amount of the land was barren, and petitioned for a warrant to resurvey the grant in order to include some better land. After obtaining permission, Alexander made a new survey and came out with 920 acres, which were called Friendship Enlarged. This was patented to Alexander in May of 1716.

There are numerous land transactions involving this estate over the years, as the land was divided and either sold or gifted away. In general, the land remained in the Beall family for a number of years. The publication entitled Early Families of Southern Maryland reports that in 1719, Alexander gave his son Ninian 436 acres of Friendship Enlarged; this tract of land then became known as Upper Tract of Friendship Enlarged.. Ninian gave part of Upper Tract to his son Benjamin in 1761. At some point after this, the land was resurveyed & renamed Hard Struggle.

On March 6, 1765, Benjamin Beall, son of Ninian Beall and grandson of Alexander Beall, sold 243 acres, part of Hard Struggle, formerly Upper Tract and Friendship Enlarged, to Abraham Davenport, a blacksmith. Abraham sold the land to William Dunn in 1780, as noted above.


Location of Friendship Enlarged

According to a description included by T.H.S. Boyd in his book entitled, The History of Montgomery County, Maryland, Friendship Enlarged extended "from near the county line up to the north of Bond's Mill, on the Ashton and Sligo turnpike." (Sligo is now Silver Springs) Other descriptions place the grant as fronting on the Northwest Branch of the Patuxent River, a short distance from their juncture; or as on the north side of SW branch of Patuxent River The history of Hillandale, found on the town's webpage, places the estate between the Northwest and Paint Branches.

By whatever description, we believe it can be said, in general, that William's land, as part of the old grant "Friendship Enlarged" was located near the present-day community of Burnt Mills, northwest of Hillandale, and north of Silver Springs, in Montgomery County, Maryland.




1783 TAX ASSESSMENT ROLL

William Dunn appears on the 1783 Tax Assessment Roll of Lower Newfoundland Hundred as owner of 170 acres of land, known as Hard Struggle, 140 acres of which were cleared, with one old log house, all valued at 85 pounds.

The following are listed in the 1783 Tax Assessment Roll for Montgomery County:

Augustus Dunn. Lower Newfoundland, Rock Creek, and North West Hundred.

William Dunn. Hard Strugle, 170 acres. Lower Newfoundland, Rock Creek, and North West Hundred.

William Dunn, Jr.. Lower Newfoundland, Rock Creek, and North West Hundred.

William Dunn, Sr. Lower Newfoundland, Rock Creek, and North West Hundred.

Others on list: Wilson family; Aldridge family; Prather; Sheckel; Cecil. The Wilson and Aldridge family marry into our Dunn Family. The Sheckel family was discussed above. The Prather and Cecil families show up in Kentucky, and marry into our Walden family.




SALE OF LAND

On March 5, 1787, William Dunn sold 36 3/4 acres of land to Walter Beall. The land was described as bordering on "Friendship Enlarged" and taken from "Hard Struggle" and "Good Will." Consideration 128 pounds and 10 shillings.

Recorded at Liber C, page 471, Montgomery County Deed Records, Rockville, Maryland.




PURCHASE OF LAND

On May 24, 1787 Walter Beall deeded to William and Mary Dunn a tract of 4 1/2 acres in "Friendship Enlarged" for consideration of 5 pounds, 3 shillings, and 6 pence.

Recorded at Liber C, page 532, Montgomery County Deed Records, Rockville, Maryland.




WITNESS TO WILL

In December of 1785, William Dunn Sr. was a witness to the will of Richard Cheney, in Montgomery County, Maryland.




1790 CENSUS

The 1790 Census of Montgomery County, Maryland, lists the following:

William Dunn Sr., 2 males over 16, 2 females, 3 slaves
William Dunn Jr. 1 male over 16, 3 males under 16. 3 females, 8 slaves
Augustine Dunn
Benjamin Dunn
Hugh S. Dunn
John Dunn, overseer for Wm Robertson

Thanks to John for this information




1793 TAX LIST


5th District, Montgomery County
Auguston Dunn: 7 slaves, 41 pounds value of personal property, no real estate
Benjamin Dunn: 5 slaves, 28 pounds value of personal property, no real estate
John Dunn: 1 slave; 26 pounds value of personal property, no real estate
William Dunn: 2 slaves, 76 pounds value of personal property, 160 acres Hard Struggle
William Dunn Jr: 7 slaves, 84 pounds value of personal property, 2 acres Chapel Forest

Thanks to John for this information




MARYLAND MILITIA

On June 18, 1794, "Osburn Dunn" was commissioned as a lieutenant in the 18th Regiment of Maryland militia from Montgomery County.

We do not know the relationship of this Osburn to William and Mary. According to family stories, this commission was carried by the Dunn family when they migrated to Kentucky.


On this same date, June 18, 1794, a William Dunn (no Sr. or Jr.) was also commissioned as a lieutenant in the 18th Regiment of Maryland militia.


On September 6, 1794, Osburn and William are shown as having resigned from militia. William also mentioned as promoted.




SALE OF "HARD STRUGGLE" &"GOOD WILL"

On October 8, 1795, William Dunn sold his Maryland farm to Upton Beall for consideration of 364 pounds. The property was described as containing 243 acres and all appurtenances of the tract known as "Hard Struggle" formerly "Friendship Enlarged," also 20 1/4 acres of the tract called "Good Will."

Mary, wife of William, was privily examined.

Recorded at Maryland Land Deeds, Liber G, pp 24 - 26, Montgomery County Deed Records, Rockville, Maryland.




MOVE TO KENTUCKY

William and Mary moved to Kentucky in late 1795 or early 1796. As noted above, William and Mary sold their land in Montgomery County in October of 1795. They gave their consent for the daughter Nelly's marriage to Nathan Douglas on May 31, 1796, in Lincoln County, Kentucky.

William Dunn Jr. served as Nathan's surety on the marriage bond.


Marriage Bond


Marriage Consent
Click on images for full-size view



Several of William and Mary's children also moved to Kentucky around this same time. Sons William Jr., Augustine, Benjamin, John, as well as daughters Eleanor and Nancy also moved to Kentucky. The Dunns were not alone in their move to Kentucky. A biographical sketch of John A. Wilson, a great-grandson of William and Mary, printed in Kentucky Genealogy and Biography Volume IV notes that Wilsons and the Dunns were two of about twenty families who moved to Garrard County from Maryland in the late 1790s.


According to Dr. Dunn, the family carried a "lap box" containing family mementos when the family migrated to Kentucky. Included were the copy of Richard Sheckles' will, and Osburn Dunn's commission. Also, as family tradition holds, gold with which Augustine Dunn purchased his land. The box was handed down through Augustine's family. As of 1960, it still existed.


The Dunns settled near present-day Bryantsville, Garrard County, Kentucky. This area was within the boundaries of Lincoln County when the Dunns arrived, but became part of Garrard County when that county was formed in 1797. There is no record of William Dunn ever owning land in Garrard County. We presume he and Mary either leased a place or lived with one of their sons. Sons William Jr., Augustine, and Benjamin all purchased land in Garrard County.




1796 TAX ROLL
LINCOLN COUNTY

William Dunn, Sr. is listed on the 1796 tax rolls for Lincoln County, Kentucky. The following entries were recorded:

Chargeable with Tax: William Dunn Sr.
Acres of land and rate: -
Water course: -
In whose name entered: -
In whose name surveyed: -
In whose name patented: -
White males over 21: 1
White males over 16: -
Blacks over 16: 2
Total blacks: 7
Horses: 2
Cattle: 1

Retail stores:




1797 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

William Dunn
No land recorded
White male over 21: 1
White males over 16: -
Blacks over 16: 1
Total blacks: 4
Horses: 2
Retail stores: -




AUGUSTINE PURCHASES LAND

In October of 1798, Augustin Dunn purchased 230 acres of land in Garrard County from William Lamme. The land was located on Dicks River, and was part of Samuel Scott's settlement and preemption. Augustin paid 300 pounds sterling for the land.




WILLIAM JR. PURCHASES LAND

On June 3, 1799, William Dunn purchased 272 acres of land in Garrard County from William & Frances Bryant. The land was located on Boon's Mill and Scott Creek, a branch of Dicks River. William paid 425 pound current money for the land.

Although William is not designated as Sr. or Jr., the tax records never show William Sr. with any land, while William Jr. is listed with land on Boone's Creek. Plus, William Jr. later sells part of this tract of land to his son Walter. Thus, we presume this is William Jr. purchasing land in 1799.




1799 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

(there are no tax books for 1798)

William Dunn
White Males over 21: 1
White Males over 16: -
Blacks over 16: 1
Total Blacks: 5
Horses and Mares: 3
Ordinary License: -
Billard Tables: -
? Slaves: -
Stud horses: -
Rates of Covering: -




1800 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

William Dunn
No land recorded
White males over 21: 1
White males over 16: -
Blacks above 16: 1
Total blacks: 5
Horses: 4
Tavern License: -
? can't read column: -
Stud horses: -
Rates of Covering: -
? can't read column: -




1801 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

William Dunn
No land recorded
White Males over 21: 1
White Males above 16: -
Blacks above 16: 1
Total Blacks: 6
Horses: 4
Tavern License: -
Retail Stores: -
Wheel Carriages: -
Value of Town Lots -
Stud Horses: -
Rates of Covering: -




BENJAMIN PURCHASES LAND

On January 23, 1802, Benjamin Dunn purchased 95 acres of land in Garrard County from Andrew Gimblin. The land was located on the Dicks River. Benjamin paid 100 pounds current money.




1802 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

William Dunn
No land recorded
White males over 21: 1
White males over 16 and under 21: -
Blacks above 16: 1
Total blacks: 5
Horses and mares: 5
Stud horses: -
Rates of covering: -
Retail stores: -
Tavern licenses: -
? can't read: -
Wheel carriages: -




1803 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

William Dunn
No land recorded
White males over 21: 1
White males above 16 under 21: -
Blacks over 16: 1
Total blacks: 4
Horses and mares: 4
Stud horses: -
Rates of covering: -
Retail stores: -
Tavern licenses: -
Value of town lots: -




1804 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

William Dunn
No land recorded
White males over 21: 1
White males above 16 under 21: -
Blacks over 16: 1
Total Blacks: 5
Horses and mares: 4
Stud horses: -
Rates of covering: -
? horses: -
Tavern license: -
Value of town lots: -
Wheel carriages: -




1805 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

William Dunn
No land recorded
White males above 21: 1
White males above 16, under 21: -
Blacks over 16: 1
Total blacks: 5
Horses and mares: 2
Stud horses: -
Rates of covering: -
Retail stores: -
Tavern licenses: -
Town lots: -
Wheel carriages: -




1806 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

William Dunn
No land recorded
White males over 21: 1
White males over 16, under 21: -
Blacks over 16: 2
Total blacks: 5
Horses and mares: 3
Stud horses: -
Rates of covering: -
Retail stores: -
Tavern licenses: -
Town lots: -
Wheel carriages: -




1807 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

William Dunn
No land recorded
White males over 21: 1
White males over 16, under 21: -
Blacks over 16: 2
Total blacks: 6
Horses and mares: 4
Stud horses: -
Rates of covering: -
Retail stores: -
Tavern licenses: -
Value of town lots: -
Wheel carriages: -
? wheels: -




1808 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

William Dunn
No land recorded
White males over 21: 1
White males over 16, under 21: -
Blacks over 16: 2
Total blacks: 7
Horses and mares: 2
Stud horses: -
Rates of covering: -
Retail stores: -
Tavern licenses: -
Value of town lots: -
Wheel carriages -
? wheels (can't read): -
taken March 21st




WILLIAM'S DEATH & BURIAL


William died sometime between March 21, 1808, when he was listed on the tax rolls, and July 18, 1808, the date on the Administrator's Bond for William Dunn, administrator "of the goods, chattles and credits of Wm Dunn, deceased."

We presume William died in Garrard County, as that is where he had been living and where his estate was probated.


We do not know where William is buried. No grave site has ever been found for him. We presume he was buried on one of his son's farms.





PROBATE OF WILLIAM'S ESTATE

Administrator's Bond

As noted above, an administrator's bond for William Dunn, administrator of the goods, chattles and credits of Wm Dunn, deceased, was executed and filed in the Garrard County court on July 18, 1808.

By its terms, William Dunn, Augustine Dunn, John Dunn, and Thomas Wilson were bound for the sum of $4,000 current money.



Administrator's Bond
Click on images for full-size view





Inventory

An inventory of William Dunn's estate was taken in July of 1808 by Samuel Gill, John Bryant, and Edward Byars. The inventory was filed in the Garrard County court on July 26, 1808.

The inventory included 7 slaves, one sorrel horse, one bay mare, 3 head of cattle, 4 head of hogs, a plow, 2 weeding hoes, various other tools, 3 feather beds and furniture, a table, a trunk, 5 chairs, a watch, a gun, a looking glass, a parcel of books, 2 saddles, a remnant of leather, and a parcel of flax.

The inventory was valued at $1,724.




Sale Bill

The bill of sale from the sale of the estate of William Dunn, deceased, is dated December 15, 1808.

The sale bill lists the following purchasers: Augustine Dunn, Erasmus Dunn, William Dunn, John Dunn, Anthony Owsley, Thomas Wilson, Thomas Young, George Elliot, Annanias Irvine, Benjamin Hudson, John Buford, John Shepherd, John Bryant, Peter Lanter, and Nathan Douglass.

The sale took in $1647.57: Of this amount, $159.36 was from the sale of various goods and farm animals; the remaining $1,488.21 was from the sale of slaves.

Nathan Douglass, John Dunn, Augustine Dunn, John Dunn, and Benjamin Dunn purchased the slaves.



Sale Bill
Click on images for full-size view





Settlement

The settlement of the accounts of William Dunn, administrator of William Dunn, deceased, was undertaken on November 11, 1811, by Samuel Gill and John Bryant. The settlement was produced to the Garrard County court for filing at the December 1811 term of court.

The settlement shows that distributions were made to Widow Mary Dunn. Equal payments of $242.84 were made to Augustine Dunn, John Dunn, Benjamin Dunn, Thomas Wilson, and Nathan Douglas, all as legatees. Payment of $20 was made to William Shackleford and William Atkins, as legatees. The amount on hand to distribute was $1890.61. The distributions made equaled $1808.61. It was determined that the remaining $82 was due the heirs of Hannah Shekels, deceased.



Settlement
Click on images for full-size view





LIFE AFTER WILLIAM'S DEATH

Mary continued to live in Garrard County following William's death.




1809 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

Mary Dunn
No land recorded
White males over 21: -
Blacks over 16: 1
Total blacks: 1
Horses: 2
Stud horses: -
Rates of covering per season: -
Retail stores: -
Tavern licenses: -
Value of town lots: -
Wheel carriages -
? of wheels: -




1810 TAX ROLL
GARRARD COUNTY

Mary Dunn
No land recorded
Whites above 21: -
Blacks over 16: 1
Total blacks: left blank
Horses: 2




MARY'S DEATH & BURIAL

We do not know the exact date of Mary's death. The best we can say is that she died sometime between January of 1811 and November of 1815.

Mary is last listed on the tax rolls for Garrard County in 1810. She executed a will on January 8, 1811. She is listed on the settlement record for William Dunn's estate, as receiving a distribution from the estate. the settlement was dated November 11, 1811.

Mary's will was filed for probate in the Garrard County court in November of 1815.


As is the case with William, we do not know where Mary is buried. No grave site has ever been found for her. We presume she was buried on one of her son's farms.




PROBATE OF MARY'S ESTATE

Will

As noted above, Mary left a will. She refers to herself as widow of William Dunn, Sr., and mentions sons William and Augustine.

Mary left her son William a bay horse, a cow and calf, two beds and furniture, together with all the farming tools and utensils and household and kitchen furniture of every kind and description that she purchased or that was purchased for her by her son Augustin or any other person at her deceased husband's sale. Mary appointed her son William executor.

Mary signed the will with a mark.

Joseph Evans, Walter Dunn, and A. Jennings were witnesses to the will.

Mary executed her will on January 8, 1811. The will was filed for probate in the Garrard County court in November of 1815, and proven on the oaths of Walter Dunn and A. Jennings, two subscribing witnesses to the will.




Mary's Will
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Executor's Bond

William Dunn, with Benjamin Letcher as surety, executed an executor's bond on November 20, 1815, Garrard County, Kentucky.




Executor's Bond
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Children of William and Mary Dunn


1. William Dunn, b. 1750-1760; d. 1840




2.
Hannah Dunn, b. 12 Oct 1753, Anne Arundel County, Maryland; d. before November 11, 1811




3. Augustine Dunn, b. 07 Dec 1757, Anne Arundel County, Maryland; d. 15 Feb 1837, Garrard County, Kentucky




4. John Dunn, b. Bet. 17601765; d. circa 1837




5. Benjamin Dunn, b. 12 Aug 1762, Maryland; d. 01 Apr 1851, Garrard County, Kentucky




6. Eleanor Dunn, b. 1776 - 1784, Maryland; d. 12 August 1859, Boyle County, Kentucky

Eleanor - affectionately referred to as Nelly - married Nathan Douglass on or about May 31, 1796, in Lincoln County, Kentucky.

For further information on Nathan and Nelly's family, please see our Douglass Family pages.





7. Nancy Dunn, b. circa 1766, Maryland; d. after 1850; presume Marion County, Missouri




8. Osborne Dunn, b. ; d.






We descend from Eleanor.





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